THE HOLOCAUST BY EYE-WITNESS: ANTHROPOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF EGO-LITERATURE

  • Vasiljeva, E.
  • Stankevica, A.
  • Semeneca, J.
  • Gelfande, V.
Abstract:
The specificity of memories, recorded in various texts, is of particular interest for the study of the perception of the Holocaust. From the anthropological point of view, the distinction between literary texts and memories as a specific kind of ego-literature deserves special attention. The coverage of the Jewish catastrophe can be a product of one’s personal memories (direct testimonies), a transmission of the information received from the eyewitnesses (in this case, a proportion of the documentary undergoes a significant correction), and, finally, the reflections on the essence of the Holocaust that are a part of philosophical reflections on the subject-object relationships between man and history. The present research focuses on three different texts devoted to the events of World War II that took place in Riga. The research methodology is based on M. Halbwachs’s theory of collective memory and on a structural-semiotic approach to the study of anthropology of texts. In her book of memoirs “Farewell, Atlantis!” (Ardievu, Atlantida!) (2011), Valentina Freimane (born 1923) reconstructs her own views on the events of the past, being herself its party and witness. The Holocaust is one of the events that influenced the fate of her generation, and the fate of the Jewish people. The novel by Irina Saburova (1907-1979), “Ships of the Old Town” (Korabli starogo goroda) written in 1947-1949, is a rare and unusual example of the representation of the Holocaust theme in Russian literature. I. Saburova is a witness to what was happening with Riga’s Jews. In the artistic world of the novel, these are not only the real events that matter, but the author’s understanding of the causes of the violence is also of great significance. In her novel “Once Upon a Time an Old Man and Old Woman” (Zhili-byli Starik So Starukhoi) (2006), Elena Katishonok, born in the 1950s, reproduces a model of collective memory. In her narrative, the perception of the Holocaust events is partly revealed through a neo-mythological structure. A comparative analysis allows for consideration of the perception of the concept of memory, the relation between documentary and fiction, the perception of man in history.
SGEM Research areas:
Year:
2016
Type of Publication:
In Proceedings
Keywords:
the Holocaust; memories; Jews; salvation; history
Volume:
16
SGEM Book title:
3rd International Multidisciplinary Scientific Conference on Social Sciences and Arts SGEM2016, Vienna Extended Session
Book number:
3.1
SGEM Series:
International Multidisciplinary Scientific Conference on Social Sciences and Arts-SGEM
Pages:
257-264
Publisher address:
51 Al. Malinov blvd, Sofia, 1712, Bulgaria
SGEM supporters:
SWS Scholarly Society; Acad Sci Czech Republ; Latvian Acad Sci; Polish Acad Sci; Russian Acad Sci; Serbian Acad Sci & Arts; Natl Acad Sci Ukraine; Natl Acad Sci Armenia; Sci Council Japan; European Acad Sci, Arts & Letters; Acad Fine Arts Zagreb Croatia; C
Period:
06-09 April, 2016
ISBN:
978-619-7105-52-0
ISSN:
2367-5659
Conference:
3rd International Multidisciplinary Scientific Conference on Social Sciences and Arts SGEM2016, Vienna Extended Session, 06-09 April, 2016
DOI:
10.5593/SGEMSOCIAL2016/HB31/S02.033
Hits: 67