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DIFFERENCES BETWEEN DISTANCE LEARNING AND FULL TIME LEARNING STUDENTS IN TERMS OF CAREER ADAPTABILITY AND SATISFACTION

A. Veres, I. Szamoskozi
Friday 9 November 2018 by Libadmin2018

ABSTRACT

The aim of this research is to investigate the relationship between career adaptability and satisfaction in the case of psychology students. We were particularly curious about the differences between distance learning and full-time learning students. Based on previous findings, the first hypothesis is that career adaptability will correlate positively with satisfaction (career satisfaction and satisfaction with life) in the whole sample. We also want to investigate the dissimilarities between the two groups (distance learning and full-time programme). Knowing the fact that the population who chooses distance learning has already got a job in higher proportions than full-time learners, may lead to differences in career adaptability, therefore in career satisfaction. Career adaptability was measured with the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale [9] and satisfaction was measured with Career Satisfaction Scale [2] and Satisfaction with Life Scale [3]. We also collected data referring to job experience, language and demographical data. The participants were from the Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Psychology. We assessed the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd year bachelor students from the distance learning and full-time programme, as well. Our preliminary results show that there are differences between the two groups, but the reasons for these differences can be attributed to several factors. Further results and implications were discussed.

Keywords: career adaptability, satisfaction, distance learning programme, full-time learning programme


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